Travels, Home and Away

Selected Doors

The narrow street called Rua de Santa Maria (Santa Maria Street) in the capital of Madeira, Funchal, is not wide enough for cars and, even if it was, tables and chairs from the many restaurants and cafes are taking up most of the space. This is the old part of the city, not far from the water’s edge and the Fort.

In an effort to revitalise the area, the local council has organised an art project in the street involving the doors of the buildings.

About 200 doors – into houses, restaurants, businesses, galleries – have been handed over to artists and designers who have been asked to ‘do something’ with them.

Many have a qr code with the details on the tinternet.

Another Amble in to Madeira.

Stork sculpture outside the Hole in One. https://hole-in-one-madeira.negocio.site

Terraced Gardens

St. Catherine’s Park

Fowler of Leeds Steam Roller

The Cathedral of Our Lady of the Assumption

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cathedral_of_Funchal

Silver Altar Front.

Back to the Fish Market

The Mercado dos Lavradores selling fruit, vegetables, flowers and fish. The building was designed by Edmundo Tavares and opened on 24 November 1940. The facade, main entrance and fish market contain panels of tiles depicting regional themes, executed by João Rodrigues.

Many of the vendors wear the colourful national costume.
Christmas tree on the esplanade.

Te Cathedral Tower

The trees in the distance were killed off in the devastating fires of August 2016

Bronze mermaid in the marina.

Ricardo Jorge Abrantes Velosa (also: Veloza) (Rio de Janeiro 1947), Madeiran sculptor.

Christopher Columbus

Funchal, in January 2019

It’s difficult to walk around in Funchal without noticing the many bronze statues adorning traffic roundabouts, this’s on on our walk in to the city near Reid’s Palace Hotel.

This restaurant is famous for its seafood and has live lobsters in a tank by the door but the alley of flowering plants and shrubs is lovely.

Catarina Park

http://www.helloguidemadeira.com/en/places-to-see/gardens-parks/santa-catarina-park

Lunch in the Marina.

Poncha

The Poncha da Madeira recipe has its roots with the fishermen of the seafaring village of Câmara de Lobos, the ones who actually created this iconic drink from Madeira Island. The Poncha (the local abbreviation) was drunk by the fishermen before they went fishing as a prophylactic against the flu and other sicknesses. By putting together, all the ingredients know when (late 18th century) to be effective against the common cold: alcohol, honey and lemon, they ended up creating Madeira’s signature drink. A drink that is still used by locals to prevent and treat colds and flu’.

Lieutenant General Robert Stephenson Smyth Baden-Powell, 1st Baron Baden-Powell, OM GCMG GCVO KCB DL (22 February 1857 – 8 January 1941), also known as B-P or Lord Baden-Powell, was a British Army officer, writer, author of Scouting for Boys which was an inspiration for the Scout Movement, founder and first Chief Scout of The Boy Scouts Association and founder of the Girl Guides.
(Source:Wikipedia)

The bust was made by the sculptor Ricardo Jorge Abrantes Velosa in 1997 and was put up in 1998.

BADEN POWELL
1857 – 1941

A Trip to the East

We got David “the taxi” to drive us for the day on Wednesday. The weather started off drab and rainy.

The Garajau Christ King Statue is located in the Cristo Rei Viewpoint with a magnificent view of the Garajau Beach. This statue is a work written by the French sculptor Georges Serraz.

The monument is a statue of Christ with open arms, facing the ocean. This statue was funded and built by advisor Aires Ornelas, son of the last scion of Reed, and was inaugurated on 30 October 1927.

This may be another aloe, who knows.

Underneath the new airport extension.

At Machico the weather brightened

Tristão Vaz Teixeira (c. 1395–1480) was a Portuguese navigator and explorer who, together with João Gonçalves and Bartolomeu Perestrelo, was the official discoverer and one of the first settlers of the archipelago of Madeira(1419–1420)

Caniçal And the Whaling Museum

http://www.museudabaleia.org/en/

During the fake dive.

Then on to the end of the road at Ponta do Buraco.

David drove us back via the wicker weaving village of Camancha

Apart from being well-known among Portuguese sports fans as the venue for Portugal’s first football match Camacha today is all about one traditional product – wicker. Harvested in the nearby mountains, it’s dried and graded before being twisted and weaved into myriad objects of varying degrees of usefulness. The industry’s epicentre is a building in the town centre called O Relógio (The Clock), which houses a workshop, shop and displays.

This being Madeira, the O Relógio building is entered on the 2nd floor, where you’ll find the shop. Half exhibition, half souvenir emporium, the wicker comes in all shapes and sizes, from huge mirror frames and doll’s house furniture to suitcases and bread baskets, mini Monte toboggans and lampshades to fruit baskets and wine bottle holders. Prices are very reasonable and the quality extremely high – items often last for decades.

Down a level from the shop an exhibition of wicker creations will have you reaching for your camera. A wicker replica of Zarco’s caravel sails towards the stairs while wicker monkeys and frogs stare back at you with old-fashioned teddy-bear eyes. You won’t be reaching for your wallet here, though – no matter how much you offer, sadly none of this is for sale. What is for sale are the large pieces of furniture, very popular among Madeira’s smaller guesthouses and quinta hotels. 

Arguably the most interesting part of O Relógio is the basement where four or five nimble-fingered local craftspeople sit on old cushions creating items for the shop. They’ll gladly demonstrate their skill and let you handle the items they make, but few speak any English. Here you can also see the crude wooden templates they use to fashion baskets and lampshades, as well as inspect the bushels of graded wicker stacked up against the walls.

We finished the evening off with a visit to the casino…

…This being Madeira, the O Relógio building is entered on the 2nd floor, where you’ll find the shop. Half exhibition, half souvenir emporium, the wicker comes in all shapes and sizes, from huge mirror frames and doll’s house furniture to suitcases and bread baskets, mini Monte toboggans and lampshades to fruit baskets and wine bottle holders. Prices are very reasonable and the quality extremely high – items often last for decades.

Down a level from the shop an exhibition of wicker creations will have you reaching for your camera. A wicker replica of Zarco’s caravel sails towards the stairs while wicker monkeys and frogs stare back at you with old-fashioned teddy-bear eyes. You won’t be reaching for your wallet here, though – no matter how much you offer, sadly none of this is for sale. What is for sale are the large pieces of furniture, very popular among Madeira’s smaller guesthouses and quinta hotels. 

Arguably the most interesting part of O Relógio is the basement where four or five nimble-fingered local craftspeople sit on old cushions creating items for the shop. They’ll gladly demonstrate their skill and let you handle the items they make, but few speak any English. Here you can also see the crude wooden templates they use to fashion baskets and lampshades, as well as inspect the bushels of graded wicker stacked up against the walls.

We finished the day with a visit to the Casino…

… to see the brilliant Madeira Mandolin Orchestra perform.

Madeira, in January

I have escaped the relative cold in January in Keynsham to the beautiful Atlantic Island of Madeira approximately 300miles west of Casablanca in Morocco.

We are staying in the Pestana Palms, Lido, Funchal it’s about a 40 minute walk from the centre of the city. When we arrived on Monday lunchtime it was pleasantly warm and we sat by the pool and relaxed as we had all had a very early start to get to the airport for our 07.10 flight..

On Tuesday we walked to Camera de Lobos, the fishing village where Winston Churchill came to paint.

Storm damage

The Pride of Madeira https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echium_candicans
Swan’s Neck Plant https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Agave_attenuata
Vasco da Gama
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasco_da_Gama
First view of Camera de Lobos
Inside the church of St Sebastian by the harbour.

Poncha is a traditional alcoholic drink from the island of Madeira, made with aguardente de cana, honey, sugar, orange/lemon juice and with different fruit juices according to the version of poncha, but traditionally lemon juice is used. 

McMahons Point, Barangaroo, and the Coal Loader, Sydney NSW

Revamped wharves.

Munn’s Slipway

The opening of Barangaroo Reserve In 2018 has allowed Sydneysiders to walk around a part of the Sydney harbour foreshore that had been closed off to the public for more than 100 years. The six hectare parkland has transformed one of Sydney’s oldest industrial sites, stretching back two centuries. The topography of the park was inspired by the shape of the 1836 shoreline, which was cut away over time to make way for wharves and docking activities, and the original headland. The reserve has been designed to complement the other headland parks of the harbour (such as Mrs Macquarie’s Chair and Goats Island) and aims to let visitors get up close to the water of the harbour.

Munn’s Slipway

Archaeological excavations of the site at the beginning of the park development works found the remains of a slipway from Munn’s 1820s boatyard on the site. Comprising an area of flat sandstone units forming the ramp of the slipway, with semi-dressed stones along either edge, a decaying timber rail was also found running down the centre of the slipway. Unsurprisingly, given the design of the new park to reflect the 1836 shoreline, Munn’s slipway was located beneath the proposed new sandstone shoreline on the northern shore of Nawi Cove.

Viewing the Casino site.
Artists impression of the casino!

Bridge Walkers.
Coal loader wharf

https://www.northsydney.nsw.gov.au/Business_Projects/

Commonwealth Lighthouse Service (Australia) Ensign.

Kangaroo paw

The Bridge from the Coal Loader

https://www.northsydney.nsw.gov.au/Business_Projects/Public_Domain_Infrastructure/Coal_Loader_Platform_Green_Roof_Project

https://www.barangaroo.com/see-and-do/the-stories/maritime-history/

Dangar Island

Brooklyn Marina

Dangar Island is a forested island, 29 hectares (72 acres) in area,[2] in the Hawkesbury River, just north of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Dangar Island is a suburb of Hornsby Shire and as at the 2011 Census had a population of 267, which swells dramatically during holiday seasons. The island is serviced regularly by Brooklyn Ferry Service and departs from Brooklyn and takes about fifteen minutes. The Brooklyn ferry is itself adjacent to Hawkesbury River railway station. The ferry service is in operation 7 days a week. Sydney, New South Wales. Area 0.29 km2 (0.1 sq mi) There are no private cars on the island.

History

Dangar Island has been known to the local Guringai Aborigines for thousands of years. The first European to visit the area was Governor Arthur Phillip, who explored the lower river by small boat in March 1788 within weeks of the First Fleet’s arrival. He named it Mullet Island, for the abundance of fish in the local Hawksbury River. At first the local people were friendly towards him, but when he returned a year later, they would not come into contact. By 1790, over half the Guringai people had succumbed to the smallpox the British had brought with them.

The island was purchased in 1864 and renamed by Henry Cary Dangar, the son of Henry Dangar, a surveyor, pastoralist and parliamentarian.

Dangar leased the island to the Union Bridge Company of Chicago for the construction of the original Hawkesbury River Rail Bridge between 1886-1889. About 400 Americans and their families lived there and the island boasted a large social hall, school, library and its own newspaper.

In the 1920s the island, which is barely a five-minute walk across, was divided into residential plots, though space was reserved on the beach, the flat and the top of the hill for recreational use. Dangar Island Post Office opened on 1 September 1951 and closed in 1986

The Jetty at Wobby Island on the way to Dangar Island.

From the café at the landing stage
Unique table decoration
Another café shot
Wheelbarrow detail

Tourists

The railway bridge

Kookaburra

Kookaburra

Tawny frogmouth and chics
Emergency vehicle
How folks get their shopping home from the Jetty.

Dream home

We took the postman cruise last time.

Another blog you might like.

https://www.travelwithjoanne.com/dangar-island/